Tag Archives: fable iii

The Neo Conundrum and the Cost of a Perfect Ending

Reposted from PopMatters Moving Pixels.

Books and movies are not usually about how well you read or watch them. But many games change dramatically depending on how well you play them.

I take back what I said last week about Fable III. It is indeed entirely possible to achieve the best ending with no sacrifice to one’s morals, but it came at the expense of something even more valuable: my belief in the system.

Unless you’re a computer programmer, the logarithms of modern video games are infinitely more complex than most players can understand under short exposure. For that reason, mastering a game is only one part being trained by the system; the other part is the search for the programming’s underlying logic. In fact, in a lot of cases, to remain immersed and fooled by the game’s hidden mechanics the player has to willfully ignore the same tools needed to become fully proficient with it.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Gaming and the Politics of Control

Reposted from PopMatters Moving Pixels.

It’s election day here in the States, and also the first day of the hearing for Schwarzenegger v. EMA, the United States Supreme Court case which will potentially decide the legal status of video game regulation in the country. Much of the game industry and blogosphere has come out against the bill at the heart of the case, which industry spokesmen say will not just regulate sale of games in stores but effectively censor game content.

It’s been an interesting year for software consumers, politically; early 2010 saw the rise in prominence of Gamers4Croydan, an Australian political action group aimed at loosening censorship restrictions on games in the country. The group lost steam soon after Attorney General Michael Atkinson resigned from his position, but the move for an R18+ rating continues. Here in the United States, the Video Game Voters Network (VGVN), sponsored by the Entertainment Software Association, has also risen to noteworthiness in the weeks leading up to today’s SCOTUS arguments.

Continue reading